AAAI Publications, Second AAAI Conference on Human Computation and Crowdsourcing

Font Size: 
Community Poll: Externalizing Public Sentiments in Social Media in a Local Community Context
Patrick C. Shih, Kyungsik Han, John M. Carroll

Last modified: 2014-09-05

Abstract


Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are commonly used to disseminate up-to-date news information, but they also contain a lot of noise and irrelevant content. The contents of social media platforms are typically filtered by followship or friendship oriented relationships, and is almost always driven by trending news topics at the national scale, making it difficult for users to gather useful information that is most pertinent to a local community context. Research has utilized content analysis techniques to gain insights on the sentiment expressed about political topics on social media sites. However, there has been little attempt to understand how users would perceive this information if opinions and sentiments about news topics were externalized and made aware to them. We designed Community Poll, a smartphone application that aggregates local news feeds with relevant tweets about the local news topics. A Public Attitude Meter is calculated based on the sentiment score of the tweets for each of the local news topic presented in the system. We conducted a 2-week deployment with 16 users about their perception of the system. The users reported that Community Poll helps them digest locally relevant news topics, and quickly gather public opinions associated with the topics. They reported that being aware of public sentiment encouraged them to more actively participate in discussions on social media. Curiosity about a score-based representation is an important element that drove them to consume local news topics that they wouldn’t otherwise be exposed to. Interestingly, although being aware of public sentiment served to reaffirm people’s positions on the local topics, users expressed concerns about how sentiment awareness might bias other people’s judgments regarding news topics.

Keywords


Local News Consumption, Social Media, Microblogs, Sentiment Analysis, Opinion Mining

References


Bollen, J., Pepe, A., and Mao, H. (2009). Modeling public mood and emotion: Twitter sentiment and socio-economic phenomena. Proc. of the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM ’09).

Chung, D. S., & Nah, S. (2009). The effects of interactive news presentation on perceived user satisfaction of online community newspapers. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14(4), 855-874.

Daschmann, G. (2000). Vox pop & polls: The impact of poll results and voter statements in the media on the perception of a climate of opinion. Journal of Public Opinion Research, 12(2), 160-181.

Diakopoulos, N. A. and Shamma, D. A. (2010). Characterizing Debate Performance via Aggregated Twitter Sentiment. Proc. of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’10), 1195-1198.

Forte, A., Melissa, H., and Park, T. (2012). Grassroots professional development: How teachers use Twitter. Proc. of the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM ’12).

Gelman, A., & King, G. (1993). Why are American presidential election campaign polls so variable when votes are so predictable?. British Journal of Political Science, 23(4), 409-451.

Gurstein, M. (2003). Effective Use: A Community Informatics Strategy Beyond the Digital Divide. First Monday, 8 (12).

Han, K., Shih, P. C., & Carroll, J. M. (2014a). Local News Chatter: Augmenting Community News by Aggregating Hyperlocal Microblog Content in a Tag Cloud. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction (IJHCI). In Press.

Han, K., Shih, P. C., Rosson, M. B., and Carroll, J. M. (2014b). Enhancing community awareness of and participation in local heritage with a mobile application. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW ’14), 1144-1155.

Jones, K. S. (1972). A statistical interpretation of term specificity and its application in retrieval. Journal of documentation, 28(1), 11-21.

Kietzmann, J. H., Hermkens, K., McCarthy, I. P., and Silvestre, B. S. (2011). Social media? Get serious! Understanding the functional building blocks of social media. Journal of Business Horizons, 54 (3), 241-251.

Larsson, A. O. and Moe, H. (2012). Studying political microblogging: Twitter users in the 2010 Swedish election campaign. Journal of New Media & Society, 14 (5), 729-747.

Markus, M. L. (1987). Toward a “critical mass” theory of interactive media universal access, interdependence and diffusion. Communication Research, 14(5), 491-511.

Maruyama, M., Robertson, S. P., Douglas, S., Semaan, B., and Faucett, H. (2014). Hybrid Media Consumption: How Tweeting During a Televised Political Debate Influences the Vote Decision. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW ’14), 1422-1432.

Merkel, C. B., Xiao, L., Farooq, U., Ganoe, C. H., Lee., R., Carroll, J. M., and Rosson, M. B. (2004). Participatory Design in Community Computing Contexts: Tales from the Field. Proc. of the International Conference on Participatory Design, 1-10.

Paul M. J. and Dredze, M. (2011). You Are What You Tweet: Analyzing Twitter for Public Health. Proc. of the AAAI International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM ’10).

Pennebaker, J. W., Francis, M. E., & Booth, R. J. (2001). Linguistic inquiry and word count: LIWC 2001. Mahway: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 71, 2001.

Procyk, J. and Neustaedter, C. (2014). GEMS: The Design and Evaluation of a Location-Based Storytelling Game. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW ’14), 1156-1166.

Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. Simon & Schuster New York.

Scellato, S., Mascolo, C., Musolesi, M., and Latora, V. (2010). Distance matters: geo-social metrics for online social networks. Proc. of the International Conference on Online Social Networks (WOSN ’10).

Schroeter, R. (2012). Engaging New Digital Locals with Interactive Urban Screens to Collaboratively Improve the City. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW ’12), 227-236.

Semaan, B., Robertson, S. P., Douglas, S., and Maruyama, M. (2014). Social Media Supporting Political Deliberation Across Multiple Public Spheres: Towards Depolarization. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW ’14), 1409-1421.

Shih, P. C., Han, K., & Carroll, J. M. (2014). Community Incident Chatter: Informing Local Incidents by Aggregating Local News and Social Media Content. Proc. of the International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM ’14), Scopus, 770-774.

Suh, B., Hong, L., Pirolli, P., & Chi, E. H. (2010, August). Want to be retweeted? large scale analytics on factors impacting retweet in twitter network. Proc. of the International Conference on Social Computing (SocialCom ’10), 177-184.

Taylor, N., Marshall, J., Blum-Ross, A., Mills, J., Rogers, J., Egglestone, P., Frohlich, D., Wright, P., & Olivier, P. (2012). Viewpoint: empowering communities with situated voting devices. Proc. of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’12), 1361-1370.

Thelwall, M., Buckley, K., and Paltoglou, G. (2010). Sentiment in Twitter Events. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62 (2), 406-418.

Tumansjan, A., Sprenger, T. O., Sandner P. G., and Welpe, I. M. (2010). Predicting Elections with Twitter: What 140 Characters Reveal about Political Sentiment. Proc. of the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM ’10).

Vieweg, S., Hughes, A. L., Starbird, K., and Palen, L. (2010). Microblogging During Two Natural Hazard Events: What Twitter May Contribute to Situational Awareness. Proc. of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’10), 1079-1088.

Zhao, D. and Rosson, M. B. (2009). How and Why People Twitter: The Role that Micro-blogging Plays in Informal Communication At Work. Proc. of the International Conference on Support Groupwork (GROUP ’09), 243-252.


Full Text: PDF