Autonomous Driving in Traffic: Boss and the Urban Challenge

  • Chris Urmson Carnegie Mellon University
  • Chris Baker Carnegie Mellon University
  • John Dolan Carnegie Mellon University
  • Paul Rybski Carnegie Mellon University
  • Bryan Salesky Carnegie Mellon University
  • William Whittaker Carnegie Mellon University
  • Dave Ferguson Two Sigma Investments
  • Michael Darms Carnegie Mellon University
Keywords: autonomous vehicles, robotics, motion planning, sensor fusion

Abstract

The DARPA Urban Challenge was a competition to develop autonomous vehicles capable of safely, reliably and robustly driving in traffic. In this article we introduce Boss, the autonomous vehicle that won the challenge. Boss is complex artificially intelligent software system embodied in a 2007 Chevy Tahoe. To navigate safely, the vehicle builds a model of the world around it in real time. This model is used to generate safe routes and motion plans in both on roads and in unstructured zones. An essential part of Boss’ success stems from its ability to safely handle both abnormal situations and system glitches.

Author Biographies

Chris Urmson, Carnegie Mellon University

Assistant Research Professor
Robotics Institute

 

Chris Baker, Carnegie Mellon University
Graduate Student
Robotics Institute
John Dolan, Carnegie Mellon University
Senior Systems Scientist
Robotics Institute
Paul Rybski, Carnegie Mellon University
Systems Scientist
Robotics Institute
Bryan Salesky, Carnegie Mellon University
Commercialization Specialist
National Robotics Engineering Center of the Robotics Institute
William Whittaker, Carnegie Mellon University
Fredkin University Research Professor of Robotics
Dave Ferguson, Two Sigma Investments
Researcher
Michael Darms, Carnegie Mellon University
Team Leader
Advanced Engineering Department, Chassis and Safety Division
Published
2009-06-26
Section
Articles