YQX Plays Chopin

  • Gerhard Widmer Johannes Kepler University Linz
  • Sebastian Flossmann Johannes Kepler University Linz
  • Maarten Grachten Johannes Kepler University Linz
Keywords: machine learning, music, expressive performance, creativity

Abstract

The article is about AI research in the context of a complex artistic behavior: expressive music performance. A computer program is presented that learns to play piano with 'expression' and that even won an international computer piano performance contest. A superficial analysis of an expressive performance generated by the system seems to suggest creative musical abilities. After a critical discussion of the processes underlying this behavior, we abandon the question of whether the system is really creative, and turn to the true motivation that drives this research: to use AI methods to investigate and better understand music performance as a human creative behavior. A number of recent and current results from our research are briefly presented that indicate that machines can give us interesting insights into such a complex creative behavior, even if they may not be creative themselves.

Author Biographies

Gerhard Widmer, Johannes Kepler University Linz
Department of Computational Perception
Professor and Head
Sebastian Flossmann, Johannes Kepler University Linz

Department of Computational Perception
PhD student

Maarten Grachten, Johannes Kepler University Linz

Department of Computational Perception
Post-doctoral researcher

Published
2009-07-07
Section
Articles